OMBRE DADA NECKLACE

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OMBRE DADA NECKLACE

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Fanny Penny is an Ojai native who is a maker of jewelry, apparel, and objects for the home. She’s also an illustrator and graphic designer with a love for the simple, the folk, and the worldly—with a touch of high fashion. For this issue of The Collective Quarterly, she created an exclusive line of “Dada” necklaces.

  • SPECS:
  • Rope handmade with yarn from Habu Textiles
  • Ceramic pendant with two firings: bisque and glaze
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THE BACKSTORY:

Fanny Penny is an Ojai native who is a maker of jewelry, apparel, and objects for the home. She’s also an illustrator and graphic designer with a love for the simple, the folk, and the worldly—with a touch of high fashion. For this issue of The Collective Quarterly, she created an exclusive line of “Dada” necklaces.

She wears many hats, from clothier to illustrator to graphic designer, but her most iconic work is a line of necklaces that incorporate handmade yarn and a series of clay semicircles that often feature Native American and Eastern designs. “Feather and dot” is how she describes the mixed aesthetic.

“I can never tell why I create stuff,” she says, trying to explain the complexities that exist when art is hardwired into a person’s upbringing. Often, it’s simply about expressing concepts that exist naturally, rather than operating from a preconceived strategy. “I just make what comes to mind.” 

Whether she can perfectly explain it or not, her work has caught important eyes: It’s sold in places such as Modern Folk (a delightful boutique in Ojai), Alchemy Works (a well-curated shop in Los Angeles), and even Urban Outfitters (the nationally known harbinger of hip).

But her greatest focus is, naturally, closer to home. As she gazes upon the rosy cheeks and bright blue eyes of her daughter and notices a spot of wet paint behind the little girl’s ear, she muses: “Sadie is my ever-changing, ever-moving art project.”

Discover the full story from Issue 3: Topa Topa »

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